Aus der Schatzkammer / Testimonies

world healthWir haben eine Zeit erreicht, da jedes Gemeindeglied ärztliche Missionsarbeit tun sollte. Die Welt ist ein Krankenhaus voller körperlich und seelisch Kranker. Überall gehen Menschen zugrunde, weil sie die Wahrheiten nicht kennen, die uns anvertraut wurden. Den Gemeindegliedern tut eine Erweckung not, damit  sie ihre Verantwortung erkennen und diese Wahrheiten verbreiten.

Wen die Wahrheit erleuchtet hat, der soll der Welt ein Lichtträger sein. Unser Licht in dieser Zeit verbergen, hieße einen schrecklichen Fehler begehen. Heute lautet der Ruf an Gottes Volk: “Mache dich auf, werde licht! denn dein Licht kommt, und die Herrlichkeit des Herrn geht auf über dir.” Jesaja 60,1.

Überall sehen wir Menschen, die viel Licht und Erkenntnis hatten, aber vorsätzlich das Schlechte wählen. Da sie keine Lebensreform versuchen, wird es immer schlimmer mit ihnen. Die Kinder Gottes aber sollen nicht im Finstern, sondern im Licht wandeln, denn sie sind Lebensreformer. Sch3 86.1

Die ärztliche Mission wird dem Lebensreformer viele Türen öffnen: Niemand braucht auf den Ruf in entfernte Gebiete zu warten, der noch nicht mit der Hilfe beim Nachbarn begonnen hat. Wo ihr auch immer seid, da könnt ihr sofort anfangen. Gelegenheiten bieten sich für jeden. Ergreift die Arbeit, für die ihr verantwortlich seid; beginnt mit eurer Tätigkeit in eurem Hause und in eurer Nachbarschaft. Wartet nicht darauf, daß euch andre dazu auffordern. Geht ohne Zögern in der Furcht Gottes voran und denkt an eure persönliche Verantwortung dem gegenüber, der sein Leben für euch gegeben hat. Handelt so, als hörtet ihr Christus euch persönlich auffordern, in eurem Dienste für ihn das Beste zu tun. Quelle: EGW, Schatzkammer der Zeugnisse, 3 S. 85, 86

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We have come to a time when every member of the church should take hold of medical missionary work. The world is a lazar house filled with victims of both physical and spiritual disease. Everywhere people are perishing for lack of a knowledge of the truths that have been committed to us. The members of the church are in need of an awakening, that they may realize their responsibility to impart these truths.

Those who have been enlightened by the truth are to be light bearers to the world. To hide our light at this time is to make a terrible mistake. The message to God’s people today is: “Arise, shine; for thy light is come, and the glory of the Lord is risen upon thee.” Isaiah 60,1

On every hand we see those who have had much light and knowledge deliberately choosing evil in the place of good. Making no attempt to reform, they are growing worse and worse. But the people of God are not to walk in darkness. They are to walk in the light, for they are reformers.

Before the true reformer, the medical missionary work will open many doors: No one need wait until called to some distant field before beginning to help others. Wherever you are, you can begin at once. Opportunities are within the reach of everyone. Take up the work for which you are held responsible, the work that should be done in your home and in your neighborhood. Wait not for others to urge you to action. In the fear of God go forward without delay, bearing in mind your individual responsibility to Him who gave His life for you. Act as if you heard Christ calling upon you personally to do your utmost in His service. Source: EGW: Testimonies for the Church Vol. 7, pg. 62, 63

Taking a stand: Balancing the benefits, risks of physical activity in children

childrenTwo days ago, Aug 19, the Canadian Society of Exercise Physiology took a stand on the promotion of childhood physical activity and published their position and recommendations in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism (APNM). This position stand provides an important overview of knowledge in the area of risk of physical activity for children and suggests both practical guidelines and a research agenda. Uniquely, this position stand addresses both benefits and risks of physical activity for children. From the position stand:

Key recommendations for the responsible promotion of childhood physical activity:

  1. Professionals/researchers encouraging children to change the type of physical activity or to increase the frequency, intensity or duration of their activity should inquire whether a child has primary healthcare provider-prescribed activity limitations before the child’s activity participation changes.
  2. Physical activity researchers should prioritize the development of evidence regarding the benefits and risks of childhood physical activity and inactivity, particularly the risks of sedentary lifestyles, physical activity associated injury risks accounting for amount of activity performed, and effectiveness of current risk management strategies and screening approaches.
  3. Professionals and researchers should prioritize the dissemination of information regarding the benefits of physical activity and the risks of sedentary behaviour in children.
  4. Parents and professionals should encourage all children to accumulate at least 60 minutes of physical activity daily.

Dr. Pat Longmuir, lead author, a scientist with the Healthy Active Living and Obesity (HALO) Research Group at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute (CHEO-RI) explains why this project started:

“Essentially, it was because of concerns that encouraging children to do vigorous activity was ‘dangerous’ in that it might precipitate a cardiac arrest due to an unrecognized cardiac condition (e.g., the child who dies playing ice hockey). There were equally strong desires to encourage greater physical activity, including vigorous intensity activities, based on current guidelines and recommendations for optimal health (60 mins/day and vigorous at least 3 days/week). We also knew that decisions on this topic are often made based on the personal experiences/beliefs of the individual making the decision because the research/data is almost non-existent. The goal with the position stand was really two-fold:

  1. Make it clear that there is very little to no good data on this topic (and research needs to be done)
  2. Until we have better data, our expert group recommendation is to determine if a child has healthcare provider-prescribed activity restrictions before suggesting any physical activity changes.”

Lori Zehr, President of the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology comments: “The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology is extremely supportive of the research conducted in the making of this position stand. The impact of physical activity on children has and always will be an important goal for us. Our physical activity/sedentary behavior guidelines outline the evidence-based recommendations for newborns to youth 17 years of age. We have confidence that this position stand highlights the importance of evidence supporting the benefits, and risks, of childhood physical activity as well as the particular risks associated with their inactivity.”

Dr. Terry Graham, Editor APNM comments: “CSEP, the national voice for exercise physiology, has published an objective report that considers not only the benefits but also the risks of physical activity. The latter have rarely been considered in such young individuals; these may be serious injuries with long term health implications and in rare circumstances sudden death. In today’s world many young children are under the supervision of professionals for extended periods of time while both parents work and furthermore, children are often encouraged to take part in ‘sport camps’ that may provide prolonged, intense exercise. Thus this position stand is particularly timely and applicable to our society.”

Read full article. Source: Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

Poor sleep quality increases suicide risk for older adults

sleep deprivationOlder adults suffering from sleep disturbances are more likely to die by suicide than well-rested adults, according to a study. “This is important because sleep disturbances are highly treatable, yet arguably less stigmatizing than many other suicide risk factors,” noted the lead author of the study.

“This is important because sleep disturbances are highly treatable, yet arguably less stigmatizing than many other suicide risk factors,” said Rebecca Bernert, PhD, lead author of the study. Bernert is an instructor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of the Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory at Stanford.

Bernert said older adults have disproportionately higher rates of suicide risk compared to other age groups, making suicide prevention in elderly populations a pressing public health challenge. Using data from an epidemiological study of 14,456 adults aged 65 and older, Bernert and her colleagues compared the sleep quality of 20 who died by suicide with the sleep patterns of 400 similar individuals over a 10-year period. They found that participants reporting poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within a 10-year period than participants who reported sleeping well.

The study confirmed the relationship between depression and suicide risk, while also assessing poor sleep as an independent risk factor. “Our findings suggest that poor sleep quality may serve as a stand-alone risk factor for late-life suicide,” Bernert said. Surprisingly, the study found that, when comparing the two risk factors, poor sleep predicted risk better than depressive symptoms. The combination of poor sleep and depressed mood was the strongest predictor of suicide risk. “Suicide is the outcome of multiple, often interacting biological, psychological and social risk factors,” Bernert said. “Disturbed sleep stands apart as a risk factor and warning sign in that it may be undone, which highlights its importance as a screening tool and potential treatment target in suicide prevention. “Suicide is preventable,” she added. “Yet interventions for suicide prevention are alarmingly scarce.”

Bernert has two studies now underway testing the effectiveness of an insomnia treatment for the prevention of depression and suicidal behaviors. Most of the study’s suicide decedents were white men, which reflects a group at heightened risk for suicide in the general population, Bernert said, noting that additional research is needed to see if the correlation between disturbed sleep and suicide risk extends to women, minorities and younger adults or teenagers.

Source: Stanford University Medical Center

Climate change could drive rise in debilitating disease

Buruli_ulcer_460A disease prevalent in developing countries could be spread by the changes in rainfall patterns according to a new study.

Buruli Ulcer affects thousands of people every year, mainly in developing countries, and in the worst cases can cause fatality or permanent disability. The devastating bacterial infection starts with an area of swelling that becomes ulcerated, causing painful open wounds and necrosis of the skin. It is unknown how the water-borne disease is transmitted.

The study, published in Emerging Microbes and Infections, found a strong link between Buruli Ulcer outbreaks in French Guiana, in South America, and changes in complex rainfall patterns, including extreme rainfall events driven by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). ENSO refers to warm and cool ocean-atmosphere events that take place off the coast of Western South America — with the study showing that this atmospheric anomaly can affect the spread of disease in this area.

Researchers from Bournemouth University found that outbreaks of Buruli Ulcer can be triggered by changes in climate, with rainfall playing a large part in the spread of the disease.

Bournemouth University’s Aaron Morris was lead investigator on the research project as a part of his PhD. Aaron said, “Understanding how infection levels respond to climatic factors is hugely important, particularly with poorly understood, emergent diseases such as Buruli Ulcer. These links help us shed light on their ecology and enable us to more accurately predict outbreaks. They are also vital in understanding how climate change will affect the dynamics and emergence of pathogens in the future.”

The research has focussed on the link between biodiversity and the spread of diseases in humans, with field research conducted in French Guiana focussing on Buruli Ulcer. Biodiversity is an unpredictable and under-researched driving force in the prevalence and transmission of diseases, and this study shows the link between changing ecosystems and the occurrence of disease.

Bournemouth University experts Demetra Andreou, Rodolphe Gozlan and Hossein Hassani were also instrumental in researching Buruli Ulcer.

As a result of the research, it may be possible to predict and prevent future outbreaks of the debilitating infection by predicting future weather patterns in countries that are susceptible to the disease and to fluctuating patterns of rainfall. The research also paves the way for future research into the impact of biodiversity and climate change on the spread of diseases. Source: Science Daily

New hand-held device uses lasers, sound waves for deeper melanoma imaging

Handheld probe
A photograph of the handheld probe. The motor, translation stage, ultrasonic transducer, and optical fibers are all incorporated in this handheld probe for easy operation.

Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, causing more than 75 percent of skin-cancer deaths. The thicker the melanoma tumor, the more likely it will spread and the deadlier it becomes. Now, a team of researchers has developed a new hand-held device that uses lasers and sound waves that may change the way doctors treat and diagnose melanoma. The tool is ready for commercialization and clinical trials.

A new hand-held device that uses lasers and sound waves may change the way doctors treat and diagnose melanoma, according to a team of researchers from Washington University in St. Louis. The instrument, described in a paper published today in The Optical Society’s (OSA) journal Optics Letters, is the first that can be used directly on a patient and accurately measure how deep a melanoma tumor extends into the skin, providing valuable information for treatment, diagnosis or prognosis.

Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer type in the United States, and incidence rates are rising faster than those of any other cancer. It’s also the deadliest form of skin cancer, causing more than 75 percent of skin-cancer deaths.

The thicker the melanoma tumor, the more likely it will spread and the deadlier it becomes, says dermatologist Lynn Cornelius, one of the study’s coauthors. Being able to measure the depth of the tumor in vivo enables doctors to determine prognoses more accurately — potentially at the time of initial evaluation — and plan treatments and surgeries accordingly.

The problem is that current methods can’t directly measure a patient’s tumor very well. Because skin scatters light, high-resolution optical techniques don’t reach deep enough. “None are really sufficient to provide the two to four millimeter penetration that’s at least required for melanoma diagnosis, prognosis or surgical planning,” says engineer Lihong Wang, another coauthor on the Optics Letters paper. Continue reading

The cause of most diseases – a shocking truth

“When we let our inner pilot light radiate we heal from the inside out and it`s more powerful than anything that medicine can give you from the outside.”
Lissa Ranking is coming to an interesting conclusion about the true underlying cause of most of our health problems today. Even though we from ENAD do not endorse every point made in this TED-talk, we find it worth watching how brilliant people more and more come to the conclusion that there has to be something more out there to achieve complete healing, than the mere conventional approach to health.
As Christians we know what that “inner pilot light” is, that Dr Rankin is referring to. May God by the indwelling power of his Holy Spirit grant you exactly that healing that you were longing for so long.