Launch of ENAD Scandinavia

Launch of ENAD-Scandinavia!

DEAR FRIEND!

You are invited to join us at our first visionary ENAD-Scandinavia conference. Here we will get a chance to network with each other as well as to discuss the visions and strategies for the health work in Scandinavia.

INTRODUCING THE SPEAKER

We have invited Dr. Andreas Binus to be our guest speaker. He is currently working in Switzerland as an attending physician in internal medicine. He has a vision to see the medical missionary work further developed in Europe. Therefore he is also heavily involved in developing the ENAD concept together with five other young founders of ENAD.

Where: Fredheim Helsesenter, Norway

When: Oct 2.-4. 2015 (registration opens Friday at 15:00)

Costs: shared room: 400 NOK, double room: 500 NOK, single room: 800 NOK.

Registration: HERE

Early registration: until August 23

Late registration: until September 10

More info: HERE

Facebook: Join us on Facebook

Phone: +47 32 86 71 00 (Fredheim reception)

 

We hope and pray to see you there!

Sincerely, the ENAD Scandinavia Team

Fredrik Lillbäk, Jonathan Ostrowski, Alexander and Henrik Jensen, Joachim Broegaard, Jiska Rose

Newstart Map: A Quick Guide

The following guide will help you to easily mark any Health Center or Medical Institution within Europe. The goal is for everyone to easily have access to an overview of all Adventist Institutions in Europe in order to connect and share.

1Login Register annotated

 

1. Log in or register as new user

 

 

 

 

2Map

 

 

2. Click on Newstart Map

 

 

 

 

3Add Marker

3. Add your own marker

 

 

4Map1

 

 

4. You will now see your set pin on the Newstart Map

Ancient Health Trailer

Avoid the Health Mistakes of the Egyptians. Eat Like the Gladiators, and Earths Longest Living People for Optimal Fitness Mentally and Physically. Come with us on a journey through ancient history down to today. From 3500 years ago in Egypt to the gladiators of Ephesus we discover health principles that can impact our modern lives.

From World War II insight has been gained into how people reversed heart disease, diabetes and lost weight as well. Then discover some of the cultures of longevity and how the principles of healthy living have benefited the lives of hundreds of thousands around the world today. Ultimately we delve into eight lifestyle habits that have helped the world’s longest living people lose weight, avoid or reverse disease, enhance brain function and lengthen their lifespan. We also follow people who have introduced these habits into their lives and have reaped the life-changing benefits.
anchorpointfilms.com/dvd/ancient-health

Looking for a protein source?

beansLima Beans – Often referred to as the “butter bean” due to its creamy texture and delicate flavor, these beans are exceptional for encouraging good health at any age. They come in a variety of different colors and are a great vegetable protein that can be complimented with a grain to provide a complete protein source. Not to mention beans are budget-friendly and significantly healthier than animal protein sources.

Read the whole article here.

Source: Article written by Ashley Kim, Life&Health.org

 

ANTI-NUTRIENTS – WHEN YOU DON’T HAVE ALL THE FACTS

When you don’t have all the Facts

ANTINUTRIENTS – WHEN YOU DON’T HAVE ALL THE FACTS

by Risë Rafferty

Recently, my husband shared an article with me discussing the nutritional advantages that white rice has over brown rice. It presented the case that minerals are better absorbed from fortified white rice than brown rice. The culprit for binding mineral bioavailability in the brown rice was identified as phytate.

Articles sourced from those who promote “ancestral” forms of eating have expressed their concern that phytic acid found in grains, nuts, seeds and beans represents a serious problem in our diets. Calcium, iron and zinc deficiencies are attributed to this anti-nutrient. Some have even labeled it a toxin.

There are those who have witnessed the deficits in calcium, iron and zinc along with key vitamins in developing countries where the major staples of the diet are plant foods, namely grains. Associated with diets based on unrefined cereals and legumes, the nutrient deficiencies are considered to be partially due to poor bioavailability as a result of phytate content. Bioavailability is referring to the actual absorption and utilization of the nutrient. It is influenced by dietary and physiological factors. The emphasis in this arena is what can be done to increase bioavailability.

Interestingly enough, phytic acid is not the only ingredient in plant foods that is classified as an anti-nutrient. Oxalic acid, found in spinach, inhibits calcium absorption. Enzyme inhibitors, found in soybeans, prevent protein absorption. Why would anti-nutrients be found in foods that we have thought to be nutrient rich; which we believe were designed to provide optimal nutrition?

Phytate is found in the bran and germ of grains, in legumes, nuts and seeds. It prevents premature germination and stores the phosphorous that plants need to grow. We wouldn’t be able to store these food items through the winter if it weren’t for phytates. When seed germination begins, for example, after a good soaking in the ground, “phytate is hydrolysed, and phosphorous along with minerals such as calcium, magnesium and iron are liberated, becoming available for germination and development of the seedlings.”1

PHYTIC ACID IS A PHYTOCHEMICAL WITH SIGNIFICANT ANTI-CANCER AND OTHER HEALTH BENEFITS

Phytate’s molecular structure is attracted to minerals and binds with them, plain and simple. Phytate sounds fine and dandy for the seed’s sake, but what about its impact on us?

Lab analysis and experiments have demonstrated that when phytic acid is added to refined flour magnesium absorption is decreased. “Consuming 5-10 mg of phytic acid can reduce iron absorption by 50%.”2 While in the intestines, phytic acid can bind the minerals iron, zinc, and manganese. Once bound, they are then excreted. All that good nutrition is whisked away.

Interestingly enough, however, there are others who have found a bright side to the apparently bleak phytate saga. They call phytate a phytochemical, an antioxidant, a blood sugar lowering agent, and an anti-cancer compound. Another term for phytate is inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). I will cite some conclusions of researchers who approached phytate from the other side of the mountain.

Continue reading

Calcium in a Vegan Diet

Calcium-in-a-Vegan-Diet-960x960

Most people equate calcium with milk. While milk does contain calcium, there are many people who wish to avoid milk products for other health reasons. Are there any sources of calcium for those of us who do not drink milk?

Clarifying questions such as

  • Why is Calcium Important for the Body?
  • What Inhibits Calcium Absorption?
  • Medical Issues Related to Calcium Deficiency

 

… will help you to better understand and implement the intake of calcium in a vegan diet.

Read the whole article.

Source: Life&Health.org