WHO stuft verarbeitetes Fleisch als krebserregend ein

processedMeat1

Wahnsinn, jetzt ist es offiziell so. Die WHO stuft – basierend auf 800 Studien – verarbeitetes Fleisch als krebserregend ein: https://www.tagesschau.de/inland/who-fleisch-krebs-101.html

“Das Risiko steigt demnach umso stärker, je mehr Fleisch ein Mensch isst. “Jede verzehrte Portion verarbeiteten Fleischs von täglich 50 Gramm erhöht das Darmkrebsrisiko um 18 Prozent”, hieß es in der IARC-Studie. Eine Arbeitsgruppe aus 22 Experten hatte mehr als 800 Studien über die Folgen des Fleischkonsums ausgewertet. (…) Es gebe “starke Anzeichen” für einen direkten Zusammenhang zwischen dem Konsum von rotem Fleisch und dem Risiko, an Darm-, Bauchspeicheldrüsen- und Prostatakrebs zu erkranken.”

The Okinawa Diet: Living to 100

What would happen if you centered your diet around vegetables, the most nutrient-dense food group?

“The plant-based nature of the diet may trump the caloric restriction, though, since the one population that lives even longer than the Okinawa Japanese don’t just eat a 98% meat-free diet, they eat 100% meat-free. The Adventist vegetarians in California, with perhaps the highest life expectancy of any formally described population.”

Vegetarian Dietary Patterns and the Risk of Colorectal Cancers

Michael J. Orlich, MD, PhD1,2; Pramil N. Singh, DrPH1; Joan Sabaté, MD, DrPH1,2; Jing Fan, MS1; Lars Sveen1; Hannelore Bennett, MS1; Synnove F. Knutsen, MD, PhD1,2; W. Lawrence Beeson, DrPH1; Karen Jaceldo-Siegl, DrPH, MS1,2; Terry L. Butler, DrPH1; R. Patti Herring, PhD1; Gary E. Fraser, PhD, MD1,2

 

Importance  Colorectal cancers are a leading cause of cancer mortality, and their primary prevention by diet is highly desirable. The relationship of vegetarian dietary patterns to colorectal cancer risk is not well established.

Objective  To evaluate the association between vegetarian dietary patterns and incident colorectal cancers.

Design, Setting, and Participants  The Adventist Health Study 2 (AHS-2) is a large, prospective, North American cohort trial including 96 354 Seventh-Day Adventist men and women recruited between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2007. Follow-up varied by state and was indicated by the cancer registry linkage dates. Of these participants, an analytic sample of 77 659 remained after exclusions. Analysis was conducted using Cox proportional hazards regression, controlling for important demographic and lifestyle confounders. The analysis was conducted between June 1, 2014, and October 20, 2014.

Exposures  Diet was assessed at baseline by a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire and categorized into 4 vegetarian dietary patterns (vegan, lacto-ovo vegetarian, pescovegetarian, and semivegetarian) and a nonvegetarian dietary pattern.

Main Outcomes and Measures  The relationship between dietary patterns and incident cancers of the colon and rectum; colorectal cancer cases were identified primarily by state cancer registry linkages.

Results  During a mean follow-up of 7.3 years, 380 cases of colon cancer and 110 cases of rectal cancer were documented. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) in all vegetarians combined vs nonvegetarians were 0.78 (95% CI, 0.64-0.95) for all colorectal cancers, 0.81 (95% CI, 0.65-1.00) for colon cancer, and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.47-1.06) for rectal cancer. The adjusted HR for colorectal cancer in vegans was 0.84 (95% CI, 0.59-1.19); in lacto-ovo vegetarians, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65-1.02); in pescovegetarians, 0.57 (95% CI, 0.40-0.82); and in semivegetarians, 0.92 (95% CI, 0.62-1.37) compared with nonvegetarians. Effect estimates were similar for men and women and for black and nonblack individuals.

Conclusions and Relevance  Vegetarian diets are associated with an overall lower incidence of colorectal cancers. Pescovegetarians in particular have a much lower risk compared with nonvegetarians. If such associations are causal, they may be important for primary prevention of colorectal cancers.

Vegetable oil ingredient key to destroying gastric disease bacteria

The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with gastric ulcers and cancer. To combat the infection, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Jacobs School of Engineering developed LipoLLA, a therapeutic nanoparticle that contains linolenic acid, a component in vegetable oils. In mice, LipoLLA was safe and more effective against H. pylori infection than standard antibiotic treatments.

Read the whole article.

Source: Medical Press

Journal reference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Vibrating capsule shows promising results in treating chronic constipation: Non-pharmacological therapy

Constipation

An oral capsule that vibrates as it moves through the digestive tract has shown notable promise as a non-pharmacological treatment for constipation, according to new research. The capsule, which houses a small engine inside, is programmed to begin vibrating six to eight hours after swallowing. The vibrations (mechanical stimulations) cause contractions in the intestine, which help move stool through the digestive tract.

“Despite the widespread use of medication to treat constipation, nearly 50 percent of patients are unsatisfied with the treatment either because of side effects, safety concerns about long-term use, or the fact that it simply doesn’t work,” said Yishai Ron, MD, lead researcher for the study and director of Neurogastroenterology and Motility at Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center’s Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Twenty-six patients took the vibrating capsule twice per week and responded to a daily bowel movement and laxative use questionnaire. All patients initially underwent a two-week preliminary period without the use of laxatives. Patients reported an increase in spontaneous bowel movements from two to four times per week, as well as a decrease in constipation symptoms, including reduced difficulty in passing stools and incomplete evacuation. The study also found minimal side effects from the capsule use.

The capsule, which houses a small engine inside, is programmed to begin vibrating six to eight hours after swallowing. The vibrations (mechanical stimulations) cause contractions in the intestine, which help move stool through the digestive tract.

Chronic constipation is a highly prevalent disorder that affects approximately 15 percent of the U.S. population. Symptoms can be burdensome, leading to a reduction in patients’ quality of life.

“Sometimes, drug therapies bring more issues than relief for these patients,” Dr. Ron said. “The results of this study point to the potential for an alternative treatment that avoids the typical drug side effects, such as bloating and electrolyte imbalance, by imitating the body’s natural physiology.”

Dr. Ron said he and his team plan to initiate a controlled, double blind study to expand on these findings and further explore the capsule’s potential.

Source: Science Daily / DDW Photo Credit: Healthxchange

Grape seed shows promise in the fight against bowel cancer

grapes

University of Adelaide research has shown for the first time that grape seed can aid the effectiveness of chemotherapy in killing colon cancer cells as well as reducing the chemotherapy’s side effects.

Published in the prestigious journal PLOS ONE, the researchers say that combining grape seed extracts with chemotherapy has potential as a new approach for bowel cancer treatment – to both reduce intestinal damage commonly caused by cancer chemotherapy and to enhance its effect.

Read more.

Photo credit: wikimedia commons

Carnitine, Choline, Cancer and Cholesterol: The TMAO Connection

Expanding on the subject of my upcoming appearance on The Dr. Oz Show, a landmark new article in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that choline in eggs, poultry, dairy and fish produces the same toxic TMAO as carnitine in red meat, which may help explain plant-based protection from heart disease and prostate cancer.