The Ebola Crisis in West Africa – SDA Church Support

The North American Division is starting a social media based funding campaign to support the fight against Ebola in West Africa. Adventist Health International manages two hospitals in Sierra Leone and Liberia. They are working to provide much needed health care for the people of this region. Please support the dedicated medial professionals and staff who are putting their own lives on the line to provide relief to those suffering in West Africa.

First chromosome made synthetically from yeast

ts_S_cerevisiae_under_DIC_microscopy_free

Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, seen under a microscope, ferment fruit and grain into alcohol and make bread rise. Now researchers have taken the first step toward making a synthetic version of the organism that may perform feats regular yeast never could.

Designer organisms have crept closer to reality. Scientists have stitched together a version of a yeast chromosome. It is the first synthetic chromosome ever assembled from a eukaryotic organism, the type in which cells store DNA in nuclei. Other groups have previously synthesized chromosomes from bacteria, but this is the first step in designing synthetic eukaryotes.

Researchers from Johns Hopkins University, including a small army of undergraduate students, and colleagues report the achievement March 27 in Science. The synthetic chromosome is based on chromosome III from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but it is not an exact replica. See the article.

Source/Photo: Science News

In a surprise find, placentas harbor bacteria

ts_placenta_feat

Wombs aren’t sterile after all, hosting microbes that resemble those in women’s mouths

The placenta harbors an unexpected collection of bacteria. Its mix of microbes may promote healthy pregnancies or lead to premature births.

Doctors and scientists have long thought that the womb was sterile. They figured that babies pick up their microbiomes — the collections of bacteria and other microbes that exist in and on them for the rest of their lives — during birth and early childhood.

Last year, however, researchers found that microbes make it to the side of the placenta where it fuses to the mother’s uterus. Many scientists assumed the placenta acts as a barrier preventing bacteria from reaching the fetus, says pediatric infectious disease specialist Anna Bakardjiev of the University of California, San Francisco.

Source and Photo Credit: Science News