The cause of most diseases – a shocking truth

“When we let our inner pilot light radiate we heal from the inside out and it`s more powerful than anything that medicine can give you from the outside.”
Lissa Ranking is coming to an interesting conclusion about the true underlying cause of most of our health problems today. Even though we from ENAD do not endorse every point made in this TED-talk, we find it worth watching how brilliant people more and more come to the conclusion that there has to be something more out there to achieve complete healing, than the mere conventional approach to health.
As Christians we know what that “inner pilot light” is, that Dr Rankin is referring to. May God by the indwelling power of his Holy Spirit grant you exactly that healing that you were longing for so long.

Das Gebet als Therapeutikum?

Ist das Gebet eine „applizierbare Therapiemethode“? Soll der Patient selbst beten oder beten lassen? Einige wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zu diesem umstrittenen Thema liegen jetzt vor. Dr. med René Hefti stellt in diesem Artikel einige der neueren Studien über die Wirkung des Gebets bei Patienten vor. Die Ergebnisse reichen von einer Symptomverbesserung bis hin zum Fürbittegebet als Risikofaktor. Aber es gibt auch kritische Einwände.

 

Nearly 50 percent of physicians believe diversion of ADHD stimulant medications among teens is a problem

Stress

Two recent studies examined physicians’ perceptions and knowledge of diversion of stimulant medications for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as well as practices physicians use to prevent diversion among their patients prescribed these medications.

The results showed that while almost half of all physicians surveyed believe diversion is common among teens with ADHD, the majority never received training on the topic. Furthermore, about one-third of physicians rarely counsel teens about the health and legal consequences of diverting stimulating medication and don’t feel qualified to do so.

“Diversion of stimulation medications for ADHD by high school and college students is widespread as those with ADHD are often sharing pills with their peers, who don’t have the condition, to try to improve their academic performance,” said Andrew Adesman, MD, senior investigator and chief of developmental behavioral pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York. “Many pediatric colleagues don’t feel adequate in counseling their ADHD patients about diverting stimulant medications or are unfamiliar with some of the legal and health consequences of non-ADHD patients taking an unprescribed controlled substance.”

The survey analyzed responses from 815 physicians who specialize in ADHD — child neurologists, child psychiatrists and developmental pediatricians. In the past 12 months, 59 percent of physicians suspected some of their teen ADHD patients were diverting their medications and 54 percent believed some patients were exaggerating symptoms to obtain stimulation medications to divert. When evaluating teens for an initial diagnosis of ADHD, 66 percent of doctors suspected that some patients were trying to obtain stimulant medication to improve academic performance. Surveyed doctors also believed patients wanted the medication to either lose weight (40 percent), get high (38 percent) or divert their stimulant medication to others (39 percent).

The study also showed that the majority of physicians received no training on prevention of prescription drug diversion in medical school (73 percent), residency (57 percent) or fellowship (51 percent).

When physicians were asked if there is a difference in the legal consequence of selling vs. giving away stimulant medication, 19 percent chose the wrong answer and 36 percent were unsure. Dr. Adesman said that “in the eyes of the law, there is no difference between someone giving away a pill or selling one; they are both prosecuted as unlawful distribution of a controlled substance.”

As far as health risks, he also noted that, “A patient taking an ADHD medication has been titrated up to a certain dose over time. If someone else takes another person’s dose it can be risky because there is no health history and medication naiveté can lead to potential risks, especially if there is an underlying heart condition.

“While many prevention strategies can be used to prevent diversion of stimulant medication- informational brochures, a medication contract, pill counts, limiting pill quantities, counseling and other methods, our research showed that while doctors are encouraged to use many of these strategies, most MDs don’t believe the strategies to be effective,” Dr. Adesman said. “It is important that physicians treating patients with ADHD are continually educated about stimulant diversion problems and become active in mitigating this from happening.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by North Shore-Long Island Jewish (LIJ) Health SystemNote: Materials may be edited for content and length. / Science Daily / Photo Credit: Huffington Post

 

Why Do We Sleep

Russell Foster TED

Russell Foster is a circadian neuroscientist: He studies the sleep cycles of the brain. And he asks: What do we know about sleep? Not a lot, it turns out, for something we do with one-third of our lives. In this talk, Foster shares three popular theories about why we sleep, busts some myths about how much sleep we need at different ages — and hints at some bold new uses of sleep as a predictor of mental health.

Watch the video.