Book recommendation

Description

High Blood Pressure. Even if you haven’t received the diagnosis yet, as many as three-quarters of the Western world will have to contend with high blood pressure sometime in their lives. However you no longer need to be a victim. Drs. DeRose and Steinke along with Nurse Practitioner Li draw from cutting-edge medical research and their decades of clinical experience to guide you on an amazing 30-day journey. This remarkable book guides readers on a truly life-changing experience. This well-referenced book (over 400 footnotes) is far from a sterile medical treatise. Stories from real-life patients combined with over 100 figures, graphs, and tables, make the relevant medical science understandable for even lay readers. If you are looking for ways to control your high blood pressure without medications–or are trying to keep a normal blood pressure from creeping into a dangerous range–this book is for you.

Author

Dr. David DeRose is a physician holding board certifications in both Internal Medicine and Preventive Medicine. He has a Master’s Degree in Public Health (MPH) with an emphasis in Health Promotion and Health Education. In addition to his conventional training, Dr. DeRose has three decades of experience in the alternative and complementary health field. He has worked at some of the nation’s most innovative health centers including over six years as a founding physician, and later Medical Director, of the Lifestyle Center of America. Please click below for his professional CV.

Dr. DeRose is a published scientific researcher, who is also known for his ability to take complex subjects and explain them in lay terms. His health communication skills have been honed by more than twenty years of radio and television work and a busy public speaking schedule. Dr. DeRose is currently heard on some 200 stations as host of the nationally syndicated health radio program, American Indian Living.

Dr. DeRose is known for his ability to make complex health subjects easily understood to people across educational and cultural lines. Dr. DeRose has worked in a variety of settings including the Midwest; Southern California; Orlando, Florida; New England; and New York City. His eclectic medical background provides a breadth of experience guaranteeing that all will relate to his compelling presentations of life-changing health information.

Proffessional CV: https://www.compasshealth.net/professional-cv/

With kind permission from compasshealth


https://www.compasshealth.net/product/30-days-to-natural-blood-pressure-control/
https://www.compasshealth.net/dr-derose-bio/

 

The book is available via:

https://www.compasshealth.net/product/30-days-to-natural-blood-pressure-control/

or

https://www.amazon.de/Thirty-Natural-Blood-Pressure-Control/dp/1942730020 

 

 

High Blood Pressure: The ‘Silent Killer’


I learned about high blood pressure, which is also called hypertension, at a surprisingly early age. My grandmother has had high blood pressure for as long as I can remember. I remember asking my parents about it at a young age, but I never really understood what it was. I grew up with two misconceptions. First, I believed that high blood pressure didn’t seem that bad. Despite my parent’s concerns, it didn’t seem like my grandma’s blood pressure was affecting her much. She was thin, active, mentally sharp, and had a bubbly personality. Second, I had the impression that you couldn’t really do anything to get rid of high blood pressure. I knew that grandma took medicine for it, but the medicine didn’t seem to do anything. If it was really working, why were my parents still discussing it? As I grew up, I kept these (false) thoughts about hypertension with me. It just didn’t seem important. I’m sure my experience is not unique. Many of us still hold on to misconceptions about health stemming from misunderstandings and simply being misinformed. Today, let’s do our part to correct this.

The Truth about High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is known as the ‘silent killer’. It can cause damage to the body in many ways. High blood pressure increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, aneurism, and kidney failure. If left uncontrolled, it can even cause blindness or heart failure. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that nearly 400,000 deaths are attributed to hypertension each year.

Worldwide, over thirty percent of adults have high blood pressure. The proportion of the population affected increases with age. This means older generations are affected particularly harshly. Once someone enters their 50s, they have about a 50% chance of having high blood pressure. Perhaps the saddest thing about this is that awareness is lacking. About half of the people who have high blood pressure don’t know that they have it. It truly is a silent killer.

That was the bad news, but don’t stop reading yet. There’s good news as well…great news actually. Hypertension is not only treatable, but it is preventable—and that’s not all. This can be accomplished through natural means. You don’t need to rely on drugs or expensive treatments; simple lifestyle changes can have substantial effects.

Here is a list of some things you can do:

Reduce your salt intake. Salt is the major source of sodium in our diets. (Remember, salt is called ‘sodium chloride’.) High sodium intakes are known to raise the blood pressure. By reducing your intake of salt, your blood pressure levels can start to drop after only a matter of days.

Right now, the average American is consuming about 3,400 mg of sodium per day. This is far more than we need. The CDC recommends that adults should consume no more than 2,300 mg a day. However, that recommendation drops to 1,500 if you are over the age of 50, are African American, or have high blood pressure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease (combined, these groups constitute 50% of the adults in the United States).

Reducing your salt intake is not as hard as most people think. In fact, I can give you one tip that, if followed, will drastically reduce your salt intake: stop eating processed foods. Processed foods, including a majority of meals served at restaurants, are sodium bombs—there is just no other way to describe it. A landmark study on the sources of sodium in the diet found that processed foods contributed to 77% of Americans’ daily sodium intake.

Avoiding processed foods is by far the most important thing you can do to lower your sodium intake. If you do eat something that’s processed, be sure to read the nutrition label carefully. Also, be aware that salt goes by many different names including: monosodium glutamate (MSG), disodium phosphate, baking soda, and a host of other names that begin with ‘sodium’ (e.g. sodium citrate).

Eat a balanced diet. One of the best things you could do to lower your blood pressure is eat a balanced diet, full of fresh fruits and vegetables. Besides lowering your salt intake, diets like this will keep your fat and cholesterol intakes low. Over time, fat (especially saturated fats and trans fats) and cholesterol will clog your arteries and raise your blood pressure.

Studies have shown that minerals such as potassium and magnesium help to lower blood pressure. What foods are high in potassium and magnesium? You guessed it; fruits and vegetables are great sources. In addition to this, eat whole grains instead of refined products. And you know what? Eating a handful of nuts every day will help too.

Be physically active. Exercise is an important factor in lowering blood pressure. You don’t need to sweat hours away at the gym or have impressive athletic ability. Simply go for a walk or light jog during your lunch break or after work. You’ll have time to contemplate your day or talk with family or friends. Incidentally, exercise (as well as diet) will help you lose weight or maintain a healthy weight, which is another factor in lowering blood pressure.

Also remember that even minor changes in our daily routines can have measurable results. Make choices that encourage you to move. Take the stairs instead of waiting for the elevator. Choose a parking space that is far away from the store. (The walking won’t take you any longer than driving around looking for that perfect space anyway). Or simply walk over to a coworker instead of emailing them or shouting across the room.

Avoid alcohol and tobacco. Tobacco products are known to raise blood pressure in two ways. First, tobacco causes a temporary raise in blood pressure after using it. After a while, the blood pressure will drop again. However, because tobacco use is almost always habitual, it’s not likely to stay down for long. Secondly, tobacco also contains chemicals that damage the lining of your arteries. This damage can cause the arteries to narrow, which is another cause of high blood pressure. The CDC offers succinct advice to people seeking to ‘take control’ of their blood pressure: “If you smoke, quit as soon as possible.”

Alcohol is another substance that should be avoided. If you are seeking to lower your blood pressure, many health organizations, (including the WHO and the Mayo Clinic,) advise you to abstain from drinking. Over time, drinking too much has the potential to damage your heart (not to mention your liver). For women of any age, just one drink a day is enough to raise blood pressure levels.  Besides this, alcohol has a high caloric content and can contribute to weight gain. As we mentioned earlier, this is another risk factor for high blood pressure.

Manage your stress. Have you ever been so stressed that you felt your head was going to explode? I recently fiddled around with my cell phone software and almost lost several years of data. Boy was that a high-stress experience. I can testify that I could really feel the pressure building up inside. I guess we shouldn’t be surprised that high stress levels can raise the blood pressure quite dramatically. Although the increase is only temporary, for individuals who lead stressful lifestyles, this is cause for concern. Further complicating the problem is the fact than many people manage stress by comfort eating, smoking, or drinking. As discussed above, these things may only serve to raise the blood pressure even further.

The Results

This year, the World Health Organization is focusing on raising awareness about hypertension. What’s really cool is that they are advocating lifestyle changes, similar to those we detailed above. Why? Because pursuing a healthy lifestyle is the real solution to the problem (not only for high blood pressure, but for heart disease, diabetes, and cancer). Think about it, do we really want to put 1/3 of the world’s population on medication for their high blood pressure when it can be treated and prevented naturally? In addition, this is something that anyone can do regardless of nationality or socio-economic standing. Now, that’s great news!

If you’re looking for more information on reversing hypertension naturally, be sure to check out this excellent resource: Reversing Hypertension Naturally, with Dr. David DeRose.

[1] “CDC Data & Statistics | Feature: Americans Consume Too Much Sodium (Salt).”[2] “CDC – Salt Home – DHDSP.”[3] Mattes, R. D., and D. Donnelly. “Relative Contributions of Dietary Sodium Sources.” Journal of the American College of Nutrition 10, no. 4 (August 1, 1991): 383–393.[4] “CDC – High Blood Pressure Facts – DHDSP.”[5] Sheps, Sheldon G. “Does Drinking Alcohol Affect Your Blood Pressure?” Mayo Clinic.

by Jonathan Ewald

https://lifeandhealth.org/nutrition/high-blood-pressure-the-silent-killer/23292.html  

What’s The Connection Between Diet And Alzheimer’s Disease?

Through witnessing the effect Alzheimers has on a family member’s emotional wellbeing and their path to slow mental deterioration; spurred my desire to pursue a degree in preventative care. As a young person, I used to wonder how a patient got this disease, and if there was a solution to prevent it. Most cases of Alzheimer’s occur later in life but alarmingly, it’s beginning to also appear in younger people.

As the fields of lifestyle medicine and preventative care grow, researchers have found that a vegan diet is key to reduce the risk of this devastating disease. In the case of Alzheimer’s disease, our genes may not be our determined destiny. The question that we need to ask is: how can we alter the course of a disease that might be lurking in the future of our overall health?

Diet and mental health

Although it’s not as often discussed, our mental health has the same degree of importance as our physical health. And, just as a good diet is key to good physical health, it’s also the key to prevent Alzheimer’s disease and shield our mental health in the long run. In fact, it has been found that diet is interrelated with many conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s, and many others. Astonishingly, studies indicate that diet can influence the body’s nervous system. A higher chance of cognitive decline is seen in patients that indulge in a diet rich in saturated fats, dairy, meat products, fat, and sugar.

Another interesting report is that neurodegenerative disease risks are lowered with a vegan diet that is high in antioxidants, fiber, and low in saturated fats. It’s also been shown that cognitive health is improved with a vegan diet. Individuals in mid-life with plant-based diets low in saturated fats demonstrated a lower risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease later in life. The middle-aged group of low-risk patients was then compared to individuals with unhealthy diets high in meat and dairy food. The eye-opening results were that the latter group had a much higher risk for Alzheimer’s disease than the patients with a healthy diet. The healthy diet patients had an 86-90 % decreased risk of dementia and a 90-92% decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease compared with the patients with an unhealthy diet. A follow-up long-term study over 20-30 years found that individuals with higher cholesterol levels in mid-life had a 50% higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Even though Alzheimer’s disease is affected by genetics and age-related factors, it does not lessen the fact that the risk of Alzheimer’s is heightened by increased blood lipids, blood pressure, and diabetes.

Prevent Alzheimer’s with your diet

In 2013, the International Conference on Nutrition and the Brain agreed on evidence-based guidelines for prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.

  1. Decrease saturated fats, trans fat, hydrogenated fats. They agreed that decreasing the intake of saturated fats (dairy products meats and certain oils) and trans fats or hydrogenated fats (processed foods) reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The replacements they recommended are vegetables, pulses, fruits, and whole grains.
  2. Eat foods high in Vitamin E. Vitamin E should come from food sources rather than supplements. Consume foods high in vitamin E, such as seeds, nuts, green leafy vegetables, and whole grains. Vitamin B12 or fortified foods should be a part of the diet. Patients must be cautious when using multiple vitamins by choosing supplements without iron and copper. I
  3. Avoid products with aluminum. You should avoid antacids, baking powder, and products containing aluminum.
  4. Do aerobic exercise. You must add aerobic exercise to your schedule, which will cause blood flow to the brain to increase neural connections. One practical example of this is 40 minutes of brisk walking three times per week.

These are all practical and doable guidelines we can all follow, right?

Power-berries

I should add that there is one more power food that can boost the protection of the nervous system: berries. Blueberries, raspberries, and strawberries are effective because of their high flavonoid content. Flavonoids are considered neuroprotective and only found in plants. In one study with approximately 130,00 subjects over the course of 20 years, scientists found that individuals that consumed the most berries had a significantly lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. Increased intake of flavonoids slowed down cognitive decline.

The conclusion that these healthcare providers came to was that the vegan diet can protect the nervous system and reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases.

Compelling, isn’t it? After realizing how berries can positively impact my cognitive health, I quickly compiled a list of dishes with blueberries to implement in my meals. Here are two that are easy and creative.

Berry Rainbow Smoothie Bowl

Smoothie Base

  • 1 package (6 ounces) frozen raspberries, divided
  • 1/2 cup almond milk
  • 2 medium bananas

Toppings

  • 1 shredded coconut
  • 1 cocoa nibs (I substitute this with carob chips)
  • 2 tablespoons dried apricots, chopped
  • 35 pistachios, shelled
  • 10 fresh or frozen blueberries

Blend the smoothie base ingredients, pour the smoothie into a bowl, then top with the toppings.

[second recpie –> see link below]

https://lifeandhealth.org/nutrition/the-surprising-connection-between-diet-and-alzheimers-disease/0911063.html